Do you think that it’s harder to be poor or rich?

Of course it’s harder to be poor. Poverty is violence. It’s hard to BECOME wealthy unless you are born into it, but it certainly isn’t hard to BE wealthy. Most “challenges” faced by being wealthy can be resolved by paying someone else i.e. a ‘fixer’ : to make it go away, or advise you on how to deal with it.

*We cannot shovel the poor into ghettos, throw some food stamps and money at them and hope they figure out how to be rich some day. They need a hand up, not a hand out. We need more people to understand the problem so we can work collectively as a community and a society to reduce poverty on a global-scale instead of just asking “how come you’re not rich?”

Wealth gives you freedom and it gives you choices. You can even choose to be poor, by putting yourself on a budget and living on the same income most others do or simply by giving it away to charity and starting over from “scratch”.

Poor people have few choices, and they simply cannot “choose” to suddenly be rich. The solution to anything is always easy if you don’t understand the problem.

And chronic-poverty is not just a money problem.

 

Answer by Bernie Klinder:

Of course it’s harder to be poor. Poverty is violence. It’s hard to become wealthy unless you are born into it, but it certainly isn’t hard to be wealthy.

Most “challenges” faced by being wealthy can be resolved by paying someone else to make it go away, or advise you on how to deal with it. There are a few things that money can’t buy, but you can get close to renting those things for a while. Wealth gives you freedom and it gives you choices. You can even choose to be poor, by putting yourself on a budget and living on the same income most others do or simply by giving it away to charity and starting over from “scratch”.

Poor people have few choices, and they simply cannot “choose” to suddenly be rich. The solution to anything is always easy if you don’t understand the problem. And chronic poverty is not just a money problem. I spent 10 years as a Paramedic working with urban poor, and living in poor neighborhoods (because inner city Paramedics aren’t paid well) and I’ve learned that chronically poor people are not just “poor” in money. They are often poor in education which limits their income and job choices. They are “poor” in family, and have few people who have the resources to be a safety net and help them when things get tough. They are poor in nutrition because cheap food is not nutritious. As a result they are frequently poor in health. They are poor in choices, as they have few options and often must make choices just to get through the day – they don’t have the “luxury” of thinking about the impact 2 months from now, they just get by one day at a time. They have to take the jobs they can get, live where they can afford to, and generally take what they can get. But most of all, many are poor in hope: many chronically poor believe that their circumstances will never change unless they win the lottery. They can’t see the path from poverty to wealth, they just see walls and obstacles – and there are many.  In addition, the stress is immense: it frequently leads to substance abuse which compounds the problems they already have. It also leads to mental illness.

If you were born to a drug addicted teen mother, in an unstable household, malnourished as an infant (which hampers brain growth and limits your ability to learn for the rest of your life), then go to a substandard school with limited funds, have few positive role models, can’t read and have poor math skills, surrounded by decay, drug use, urban violence, and basically raised yourself from the time you are 10 years old, what choices do you think that person has left? You might feel angry, and alone, and convinced the entire world is against you. You may not even believe that you’ll live past 25. You have few positive role models.

I met hundreds of kids with stories that would break your heart. Most people born into middle class can’t even imagine what these people live through day to day. And this is in one of the wealthiest countries in the world. It’s worse in other countries.

There are some that manage to break the cycle and move from abject poverty to working poor. They work 3-4 part time jobs, stretch every dollar, make good choices, and improve their lives a little bit every year. It’s a very hard road with many setbacks. There are people who arrive here as immigrants with nothing but the shirt on their backs and make a good life within a few years. But they rarely do it alone (they get a lot of help from the immigrant community), and they learned their trade and business skills back home. (My father did this, we are first generation immigrants.)

We cannot shovel the poor into ghettos, throw some food stamps and money at them and hope they figure out how to be rich some day. They need a hand up, not a hand out. And we need more people to understand the problem so we can work collectively as a community and a society to reduce poverty on a global scale instead of just asking “how come you’re not rich?”

Hope this was helpful. Serious questions and comments are welcome.

Do you think that it’s harder to be poor or rich?

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If rich people have most of their money in stocks and such, where do they get money?

Answer by Bernie Klinder:

Money sitting in cash or near cash (short term investments like 30 day CDs) earns very little interest, so you’re right in assuming most of the wealth is tied up in longer term investments that may not be easy to unravel.

However, the majority of those investments would “throw off” cash on a regular basis. For example, Investors looking to get rich invest primarily in growth stocks hoping the value of the stock goes up over time. Someone who is already rich will invest in a strong stable stock that pays a quarterly dividend, like Proctor & Gamble, Microsoft, GE, etc. Hold 100,000 share of a firm that pays a $4 annual dividend, and you’ll receive $100,000 every 90 days. They would also invest in bonds that pay interest annually, or commercial real estate (shopping mall, apartment building, office building) that would earn rental income.

All of these investments could be set up to pay out to an easily accessible account that can be accessed from an ATM. They also have access to an instant line of credit for binge shopping. For larger purchases (like the million dollar beach house) things can get creative. For example, they might set up an arrangement where they purchase the property on an interest only loan, and then purchase a long term CD (certificate of deposit) at the bank for the same amount as collateral. Then they divert the interest payments from the CD to make the lions share of the payments on the beach house. Hold the house for 10 years, and then sell it when the value of the house increases for a tidy profit. Repeat as required.

The main point is, they try hard to never spend their principal wealth – only the interest earned or dividend income. Often, they don’t even spend all of that. They typically set a budget where they spend about half of the interest income and reinvest the other half. For example, $100 million earning a modest 5%, would yield about $5 million per year in income. If they can scale back a bit and try to make ends meet with just $2.5 million a year (about $200,000 a month) the principal will grow and their annual interest income would steadily increase every year.

Hope this was helpful.

If rich people have most of their money in stocks and such, where do they get money?

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Hawaii resident wins $10,700,000 ($10.7 mil) jackpot at Wynn Las Vegas.

Oahu, Hawaii resident walks away with $10,777,270 ($10.7 mil+) Jackpot on an IGT Megabucks Wynn Wheel machine (@$3/bet) around 9 p.m. Sun, 21 Aug, 2016th at Wynn Las Vegas.

Hawaii resident wins $10.7M jackpot at Wynn Las Vegas

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Taylor Swift gives $1,000,000 ($1 mil) to Louisiana Flood Relief efforts

Taylor Swift**_edit

11 dead, 30,000 rescued,11,000 people in shelters; 40,000 homes underwater, 30″+ (over 2′ of) torrential rain inundates Louisiana

Barack Obama declares national disaster; 30,000 apply to FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency

Taylor Swift gives $1,000,000 ($1 mil) to  Louisiana Flood Relief efforts

www.nytimes.com/2016/08/17/us/louisiana-flooding.html

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Should Hillary Clinton file a harassment suit against Donald Trump?

Should Hillary Clinton file a harassment suit against Donald J. Trump?

 

On what grounds? He’s not stalking her or physically molesting her. She’s running for president, she has to take a few verbal digs, what’s she going to do when the Ayatollah’s start making insults towards her?

Should Hillary Clinton file a harassment claim against Donald Trump?

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Are fantasy sports just gambling?

ATumbleOfTheDice_edit

Chance can have a greater impact on outcomes when skill levels are well matched. In an Olympic sprint event, all participants are blazing fast, so a runner’s start or the lane they’re assigned to could mean the difference between winning and losing. Likewise, it’s tough to predict the victor between two chess grandmasters, but the outcome is rarely in doubt when one plays an amateur. – The very essence of chance versus skill in contests.

•  Skill-based contests tend to exclude people who cannot succeed—to wit, it’s been years since I last played chess.

• Chance games, on the other hand, pull the floodgates wide open (i.e. lotteries, bingo, roulette, slots, keno, baccarat, craps, most casino machines and table games such as 21, 3 card, Chinese, Caribbean and crazy pineapple poker, Badacey, Baducy (but not Badugi)).

Rosters https://rosters.com

Are Fantasy Football and Fantasy Baseball More Based on Skill Than the Real Sports?

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Hearthstone gamer Jeffrey ‘Trump’ Shih : The other Trump

 

ReadyPlayerOne_edit

Ready Player One?

Gamer Jeffrey “Trump” Shih : ‘the ‘other Trump’ works 60 hours a week playing and live-streaming Hearthstone

us.battle.net/hearthstone

Making of ‘Hearthstone’ Star Gamer Jeffrey ‘Trump’ Shih – Rolling Stone

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Did you ever get over the love of your life?

Did you ever get over the love of your life? by Vinny DeVito

Answer by Vinny DeVito:

There is no love of your life. Does anyone really think that the love of their life and all of the people they know, live near them and just happen to have met them. Why not your love of your life living in China or someplace far away. This is the same as soul mates. All made up stuff in our minds.

I have loved three women intensely and each was the love of my life until the next one came along. Yes you do get over the love of your life because there is never just one person who is the love of your life and you will learn that when the next one comes along. Love is a chemical reaction in your brain and can be duplicated by others you are attracted to.

Did you ever get over the love of your life?

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Has Trump gone too far?

Has Trump gone too far? by Bil Stachour

Answer by Bil Stachour:

There is no such thing as “unelectable” to the kind of person who would support him in the first place.

There is no lie, no incivility, no indignity, no disqualification that will sway an irrational person from an irrational cause. The person who failed to turn from him for a thousand previous offenses will surely not take umbrage to this.

He himself has said he could shoot someone dead on Fifth Avenue and it would not affect his fans. And he’s absolutely right. Horrifically disrespecting another person plays well to his crowd.

This is who we’ve become.

He is the tumor on the cancerous body that is US. WE are the monster. US.

Has Trump gone too far?

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Trump appears to be immune to normal political attacks. So how can he be defeated using legal methods?

1. Energize your base and your likely voters 2. Logistically support them coming out to vote 3. Suppress your opponent’s strong-lean voters; give them reasons to not come out 4. Court your opponent’s weak-lean voters and swing voters two ways: by giving them a reason to run from Trump 5. And by giving them a place to go.

Answer by Matt Chanoff:

In this game of inches like you need to do five things:

  1. Energize your base and your likely voters
  2. Logistically support them coming out to vote
  3. Suppress your opponent’s strong-lean voters; give them reasons to not come out.
  4. Court your opponent’s weak-lean voters and swing voters two ways: by giving them a reason to run from Trump
  5. And by giving them a place to go.

For Hillary, #1 involves working with the progressive leadership, Bernie, Robert Reich, Elizabeth Warren, Rev. William Barber, Sherrod Brown, and others on the Progressive side to sell the platform and agenda that Bernie and Hillary agreed to. It also means a lot of grass roots politicking by Tim Kaine and Joe Biden, particularly in Virginia, PA, Ohio, Wisconsin, etc.. Michelle Obama needs to be active. Above all, Barak Obama needs to be very active and prominent campaigning.

Number 2 involves strong local organization. Hillary seems to have this pretty wired.

Number 3 is an illegitimate tactic when it’s used to physically stop people from voting, as with the recently overturned laws limiting voting hours and required IDs. But it’s perfectly legitimate to emphasize aspects of Donald Trump’s campaign that would cause even strong GOP leaners to stay home. Not showing his tax returns, not knowing the constitution, acting as a patsy for Vladimir Putin – different things will work with different people.

More moderate voters and fence sitters are less likely to be animated by hot button issues, and more likely to be calm enough to look at policies from a rational perspective. So number 4 involves emphasizing his inexperience, temperament, the radical impracticality of proposed policies like building a wall on the Mexican border, blocking all Muslims from the country, pulling out of climate and trade agreements unilaterally, attacking NATO, can all be emphasized.

The last thing to do is #5, giving those voters a place to go. There are a lot of people who really dislike Trump but don’t see the Democrats taking them seriously or listening to them. Hillary’s convention speech was in service of #1 above; it was a party unification speech. She and the campaign have different work to do here. Most of the jobs replacing jobs lost during the recession have been relatively low wage service jobs, and almost none of them have been for people with a high school education or less. This means lots of people who used to make $22/hour, and often with benefits, are now working at $15/hour service jobs without benefits. Lots of people own and love guns, and believe gun control laws are pushed by politicians who are ignorant and biased on the subject. There are other issues, but these are key ones, and Hillary needs to hear their concerns and respond to them.

Trump appears to be immune to normal political attacks. So how can he be defeated using legal methods?

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Projection : Donald J. Trump win

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Donald J. Trump stands at 57.5%, compared with Hillary Clinton 42.5% : Nate Silver‘s (FiveThirtyEight) Projection : Popular vote going 45.4% to Trump vs. 45.1% to Clinton, with the Electoral College giving Trump 285 votes and Clinton 252.6 (Trump has a 57% chance of winning the Electoral College). Trump is projected to win in the swing states of Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina, Iowa, Nevada, and New Hampshire.

via Alex Lightman

 

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Secrets: What is that one secret that you can never share with anyone?

 

I Know What You Did Last Summer : I Still Know What You Did Last Summer

Do you know what I did last summer?

Loose lips sink ships

Dead men tell no tales.

Answer by Anonymous:

That at 17 I’ve slept with dozens of men and been a masturbation addict since 12.

I was premature as I entered puberty. My first time occurred at 14. With a 28-year-old married man near my neighbourhood. I was really curious about sex, and he treated me very nicely. So when he asked me I consented. I know it was illegal to have sexual intercourse with 14-year-girl with/without consent, but it just happened.

It’s technically not a secret. One of my friend knows it. I told my mom a few years ago. And two of my therapists.

Every time I was with him I felt peaceful. The sex was good. I was old enough to enjoy. Although the first few times hurt. He was very supportive emotionally, and we both knew that it didn’t have a result. I had no intention to hurt him marriage/family. I think I was just compensating for my lack of father figure in my life. My father, though still alive, was very emotionally distant from me. In contrast, the married man had everything that I was craving for: respect, care, humour and most importantly the energy he was willing to share with me.

Often “secret” is related to shame, guiltiness, negative emotions etc. But I don’t hate any body. Not even myself. It happened as it did. Sometime I would even feel grateful for him. I don’t know if I can be here today if it wasn’t for him.

Before I met him, I was mired in the family fight. I hate school, and my parents hate me. I was always thinking about becoming a prostitute, or even better, just kill myself. I was clinically depressed and constantly anxious. Meeting him took my edge off.

He used to take me to pet market just because I mentioned casually that I want to raise hamster. He never interrupted me when I was speaking. I think our relationship was somehow similar to Lecter and Angela in American Beauty. The novel version of course, where they ended up having sex.

After I talked to one of my therapists, I decided to stop it, because she said it was wrong. After I left him, I started a crazy round of casual sex. I just randomly picked up men from dating sites and pubs. I even charged them for once or twice, for some expedient money. What makes me feel shameful, is that I don’t feel shameful about all that I’ve done at all. Somehow I just decided to forgive myself and letted go.

All sex happened with both parties’ consents, and always with protection(condoms). I tested twice a year. I didn’t want anything to do with these men so I deleted their contact immediately when it was over. It somehow released my hormones and calmed me down. For a very long time I felt like I was living a double life. Honour student on the one side, and slut on the other.

When I don’t have casual sex, I masturbate.  A lot. Sometimes for the whole afternoon or evening. Sometime the whole day. It is like drugs(though I haven’t tried that yet). It calmed me down a little bit. I’m always too edgy. Once I even masturbated the evening before SAT test.

I stopped all my casual sex after I met my ex-boyfriend. Not until we are separated physically for a while. I cheated on him. We ended up broking up for something else, and he didn’t know it. Or maybe he did. I don’t care any more. My ex-boyfriend was the only person that I’ve had a “normal” relationship with. He, like me, was in his late teens. All other people were just twenty or thirty something that I had one night stand with. He was a good boyfriend and I was a wishful girl-friend. I regret the second he consented my breaking-up proposal. But I deserve it anyway.

After I broke up with him, I felt hopeless for a long time. My masturbation addiction aggravated. I barely functioned. But I stopped all my sexual intercourse with human beings. I stopped catering to another body that I have no feeling for. I don’t know what’s wrong with me. I could find ONS at 17 if I want if I can find casual partners at 16. But I am tired of it.

I felt really old telling my story, but I also felt young and stupid. It’s life a long time ago and I’m not mad at anyone. It is what it is. I still don’t know if I made mistakes or not. For if you think about it this way, I didn’t lose anything. I always used protection, and never got involved in other people’s lives. It just made me feel really old.

It may not be that bad for me, for I was able to experience the life of a slut, and then decide for myself that I don’t want it. I considered removing anonymity, yet I am intimidated by the realisation that my acquittance(friends, teachers etc.) here on Quora may see me differently after they read this answer. I don’t fear judgement either; I just don’t want to be bothered by the consequence of it.

It is a secret that I can’t say to my future partner, and it’s a huge burden. What would my future partner think of me if he knows my history? What would my friends see me if they know it? I’m afraid of new relationships at 17 for fear of exposure. I deserve it for the stupid deeds that I committed at an early age, but I also deserve some more time. I’ll pick myself up and start fresh, despite what have happened before.

I know better now.

Secrets: What is that one secret that you can never share with anyone?

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What is Donald Trump like in person?

When you're one-to-one, or few-to-one with Mr. Trump, he comes across as a genuinely interested, well-mannered, business man. He asks how things are going in the building, if there's anything he can do or improve, and he offers to help without being asked for anything. It is the opposite of how he portrays himself in the media. He's the king of concierge. The character he portrays in the media couldn't be more different.  He's the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde of business and politics.

Answer by Luke Watson:

I worked in Trump Tower for 5 years … not for Donald Trump, but within his vicinity. In all of that time, I only ran into him a handful of times, but it seems that my encounters were pretty typical of the experiences most of his tenants share.

When you're one-to-one, or few-to-one with Mr. Trump, he comes across as a genuinely interested, well-mannered, business man. He asks how things are going in the building, if there's anything he can do or improve, and he offers to help without being asked for anything. It is the opposite of how he portrays himself in the media. He's the king of concierge. The character he portrays in the media couldn't be more different.

… Or is the king of concierge the character, and TV-Trump really him? That's the billion dollar question.

Mr. Trump reminds me of the child who loves attention, but doesn't know the difference between good attention and bad attention. We all know the type; under most circumstances, that child might be a well behaved, kind, and caring, but he can turn into a monster if he realizes nobody has noticed him for 15 minutes. The key difference is that the child has plenty of time to learn, and Mr. Trump … well, he's already learned that any attention is good attention, and the American media is to blame for that one.

It isn't hard to see that much of Mr. Trump's success could easily be attributed to his disparate people-skills. If he wants to do business with you, he can win you over individually, but, if he needs to get his name out there, raise his profile, distract the media, he'll simply say something shocking, ignorant, hateful, inflammatory, ie. "newsworthy", and, he won't win us all over, but he'll reach millions of ears, win some of them over, and get attention from the rest.

He's the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde of business and politics.

I have nothing bad to say about Dr. Jekyll, but don't get me started on Mr. Hyde.

What is Donald Trump like in person?

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The Great, White (Last, Best) Hope. Why didn’t the most senior men in the GOP elite-establishment move to stop Trump? The world ends, not with a bang, but a whimper.

d9686e30-d902-4961-ad68-6875c6f7f531
I
We are The Hollow Men
We are the stuffed men
Leaning together
Headpiece filled with straw. Alas!
Our dried voices, when
We whisper together
Are quiet and meaningless
As wind in dry grass
Or rats’ feet over broken glass
In our dry cellar

Shape without form, shade without colour,
Paralysed force, gesture without motion;

Those who have crossed
With direct eyes, to death’s other Kingdom
Remember us—if at all—not as lost
Violent souls, but only
As the hollow men
The stuffed men.

II
Eyes I dare not meet in dreams
In death’s dream kingdom
These do not appear:
There, the eyes are
Sunlight on a broken column
There, is a tree swinging
And voices are
In the wind’s singing
More distant and more solemn
Than a fading star.

Let me be no nearer
In death’s dream kingdom
Let me also wear
Such deliberate disguises
Rat’s coat, crowskin, crossed staves
In a field
Behaving as the wind behaves
No nearer—

Not that final meeting
In the twilight kingdom

III
This is the dead land
This is cactus land
Here the stone images
Are raised, here they receive
The supplication of a dead man’s hand
Under the twinkle of a fading star.

Is it like this
In death’s other kingdom
Waking alone
At the hour when we are
Trembling with tenderness
Lips that would kiss
Form prayers to broken stone.

IV
The eyes are not here
There are no eyes here
In this valley of dying stars
In this hollow valley
This broken jaw of our lost kingdoms

In this last of meeting places
We grope together
And avoid speech
Gathered on this beach of the tumid river

Sightless, unless
The eyes reappear
As the perpetual star
Multifoliate rose
Of death’s twilight kingdom
The hope only
Of empty men.

V
Here we go round the prickly pear
Prickly pear prickly pear
Here we go round the prickly pear
At five o’clock in the morning.

Between the idea
And the reality
Between the motion
And the act
Falls the Shadow
For Thine is the Kingdom

Between the conception
And the creation
Between the emotion
And the response
Falls the Shadow
Life is very long

Between the desire
And the spasm
Between the potency
And the existence
Between the essence
And the descent
Falls the Shadow
For Thine is the Kingdom

For Thine is
Life is
For Thine is the

This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.

T. S. Eliot

Jeffrey Goldberg on the Republican Party’s Hollow Men – The Atlantic

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Hillary Clinton officially nominated by Democratic party : All Fired Up and Ready To Go…

HIllary Clinton*_edit

Attorney Hillary Clinton : Throwing Rocks at Glass Ceilings since 1977

https://www.hillaryclinton.com

Hillary Clinton breaks the glass ceiling – POLITICO

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How do you read a stock market chart?

How do you read a stock market chart? by @sowmay_jain

Answer by Sowmay Jain:

Have you get flustered with loads of information when you turn “ON” CNBC.

I don’t about you but I’m usually blown away with the raw amount of data thrown at me.

For the average person, like you and me, there’s no channel to get stock information in simple and concise way.

There’s where chart plays a crucial role. Lots of data are compressed in stock charts. And more important, many stock market professionals bet that past chart performance of a stock can predict the future of stock. That’s why stock pundits just love graphs.

In this answer, I’m going to highlight some basics of charts that a average person should know if he has starting investing or had been investing from long time.

The best resource I use to access general charts is from “Google Search Engine”

Yeah! I don’t prefer moneycontrol or ET market or my broker’s tools. At least for basic chart.

They provide charts and the best things it’s so minimal and light weighed that even 2G network would be enough to get it right over your screen.

This is how a simple screen of Google stock charts looks like:

Best thing of this source is that every stock of every stock exchange in the world can be seen from their search engine.

It’s not having any high accessible metrics for a newbie it’s a best source.

Now with no ado, lets discuss its elements.

Blue line is the stock price movement happens through-out the day, months, years……

Straight dotted line is the price of previous close.

Upper tab is for price, price change, % change, dat……….

What? still confused! Okay, lets visualize it.

You can access price movement from different phases of time as marked in above image.

Axis information:

X – axis = Time

Y – axis = Price

Additional Information:

High – day’s high price

Low – day’s low price

Close – day’s close price

Open – day’s open price

That’s all you should know about a chart which you can easily analyse in 10 sec.

Other alternative with some extra feature would be Moneycontrol App (but it shows only Indian Stocks):

Its the best app used which is accessible from Android Smartphone.

And the extra feature I personally like to use here is its Candle stick graph which is accessible in just single tap:

And here’s the graph:

This graph shows positive/negative price trend for each hour, day, may also be week.

What? You also want to understand candle stick graph?

Phew! Here’s the image which is more than enough to understand it:

If it’s not enough to understand then this link would be to get everything about Candle stick chart – Introduction to Candlesticks.

Alternatively, you can read following books on Technical Analysis to understand it fully and deeply:

Glimpse of advance charts

Still one with deep knowledge of charts can bang the market movements and can make a good entering decisions.

Even long term investors need technical analysis to enter a stock at bargain price. And chart is also a good tool to find that bargain price.

So lets have a glimpse of advance charts…..

…….but before let me provide you a short overview which will act as a base for your chart analysis in 3 simple points (outsourced from thesimpledollar.com)

First, look at the general trend over the last six months or so. This is usually a clue as to the general health of the company – no major news, just little signs of good health or poor health. If it’s a stock you own or might be interested in, you may want to take note of a steady rise or a steady fall and find out why it’s happening.

Second, look for recent spikes. A big spike upwards or downwards means something significant has happened to the company. These are usually game changers and are definitely worth noting.

Third, see if they throw up charts for similar companies. See if the general pattern of the stock in question matches the general patterns of the competitors. If they do, then it’s probably a broad market effect or a sector effect and not quite as worrisome as something drastically different than a competitor, which you should look into.

Moneycontrol (website) provides advance charts for pro traders.

You can get it on their website. Below is the snapshot of their basic chart where you can a button to convert it to advance chart:

Which will look like this when clicked:

Now there are tons of metrics to judge the price trend but we will limit our explanation to only 3 of them:

  • Volume
  • Momentum
  • Simple Moving Average

You can see many tabs at top like Overlays, indicators etc. Volume and Momentum can be found in indicators sections.

It ticked above two metrics which will result in the following snapshot:

Now you can parallel analyse all the metrics on a single screen. In the same manner, you can use all other metrics as per choice.

Even I’m not aware of all the metrics. So only use 5–6 metrics at times.

Below is an example of SMA. After clicking on the SMA tab, you need to fill the period of moving average:

“Draw” will result in following chart:

That’s just the illustration and you can access many other parameters while analyzing stock price movement. If you’re interested in learning more about charts then Investopedia would be a great place to learn.

I’m sharing everything on my journey to Investing. I’m learning a lot, so will you.

How do you read a stock market chart?

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Who will win the 2016 U.S. presidential election and why?

Who will win the 2016 U.S. presidential election and why?

Answer by Ardavan Farahvash:

Three months ago I would have said Hillary…

And who wouldn't. With the Republican primary in a mess, and Hillary on top of Bernie Sanders, it seemed that she had a clear path to the presidency. She is the most qualified in terms of previous positions (by far), and the most experienced in terms of political tenure.

It just seems so right that a woman get the Presidency right after we elect the first black president. What a progressive moment that would be for America!

But I am not a slave to my preconceptions and based on the last 3 months I am now willing to bet my right nut it's going to be Donald Trump. Trump did better in the Republican primary than I thought he would, than anyone thought he would. Not only did Trump's campaign not fizzle out, but it has just kept gaining momentum as he won by bigger and bigger margins until Ted Cruz and John Kasich decided to stop wasting their time and drop out. Sure, the Republican party may not like him, but the Republican base does and that proved to be important. Now, as we move on to the general election, Donald Trump has a few advantages and will make a few key moves that I think will secure him the presidency, and we are already seeing him start to make said moves.

Below I have outlined the four major reasons why I think Trump is going to win the Presidency:

  1. Donald Trump is going to swing his politics, especially his economic stances to be center left. Unfortunately, Trump is not a idiot, he knows how to read the polls. He knows that for the most part Americans are on the center-left especially when it comes to economic issues. Americans like Social Security, they like minimum wage, they like taxes on the rich, hell they even like Obamacare. Trump knows this, and he has already began the process of shifting his political views so that they are in agreement with that of most Americans: Meet the Press – May 8, 2016. This is really a worst case scenario for Hillary because in the situation where Hillary and Trump are not substantially different in terms of economic policy, I do not think Hillary can win. What's worse is Hillary can't attack Trump for flip-flopping because she too has flip-flopped MANY times.
  2. Trump is infinitely more interesting than Hillary. Trump is an asshole, but he is a deeply charismatic asshole, like Bill Clinton charismatic. The guy is a professional personality, and the elephant in the room of every room he's ever been in. When you are talking about winning the presidency it all comes down to how appealing you are to most Americans. Part of your appeal is your policies and your political history, but another part (perhaps a much more important part) is your charisma. I think charisma is why Obama beat Hillary in 2008, why Bush (sort of) beat Gore in 2000, and I think it will also be a large weak spot for Hillary against Trump.
  3. Trump is a man. Look, I agree that sexism is wrong. I am also voting for Hillary in the general election. But let's face the truth, Hillary has a disadvantage in this race because of her gender, a disadvantage Trump is going to capitalize on. Let's not forget, Trump has no decency. He is going to insinuate numerous times that because Hillary is a woman she is not fit to lead, and people are going to believe it, a lot of people. He won't explicitly say that her gender makes her unfit, but he'll hint to it. For example, he might say that she's cold and callous, how that's completely unfeminine of her, and people will think that means that she is also unfit to the President.
  4. Trump's only disadvantage against Hillary are the numerous unfavorable statements he made in the Republican primary. I think Hillary's best bet at beating him is to really use his previous statements against him. This might work, but I'm willing to bet that the American people have a short enough memory that pretty soon most won't care about Trump's most egregious statements. Will Trump still make numerous distasteful remarks and insults during the general election, sure I think he most certainly will. But I think that will just play into his charisma and his outsider persona which seems to be a big plus in this election.

TLDR: No one ever went broke overestimating the stupidity of the American people and that is why I believe Donald Trump will defeat Hillary Clinton. Brace yourselves, America (and the rest of the world).

Who will win the 2016 U.S. presidential election and why?

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Is it true that “you won’t become rich working for somebody else”?

Is it true that "you won't become rich working for somebody else"? by Charles Tips

Answer by Charles Tips:

Getting ahead working for a living… can it be done?

If you work for a wage or a salary, it doesn't matter if you work with your hands, your back, your eyes, your mouth, your brain, your genitals… it doesn't matter if you work with a shovel, a computer or a scalpel. You have 3000 units, give or take, to sell in a year… hours of your life.

There are exceptions. I recall a pediatric heart-lung transplant specialist who was offered $2.5 million a year because having cutting-edge surgery available was part of the hospital's prestige branding, but I was never clear whether that was personal compensation or budget. Some courtesans can command $10,000 a night… occasionally.

But in the main with paid labor it is damned hard to negotiate yourself up into rarified air. That is because the dimensions of human labor are well understood. In almost all cases, your time is a commodity to everyone who might employ it (even if you don't feel it is). Take the 125,000 hours you might be able to sell in your life and multiply it by what you can sell them for on average (use constant dollars so as not to fool yourself with inflation), and there's your total income. And whatever you can average, guess what, you're probably not rich.

To top it all off, there's an ugly calculus few are aware of, namely, whether you are just starting out and making $25,000 or at the top of your profession and making $250,000, you've got about $20,000 in discretionary income. What!? Hey, moving up the ladder requires looking and acting the part. You can work in the mailroom and still live at home with your parents and spend all your money going out to try to find a spouse, but you don't move into the executive suite without a country-club membership, and you know how much that costs, and suits and car, and the kids need to be in the right schools… it's damned hard to get money-ahead working for a living. And, let's face it, wages and salaries have been painstakingly calibrated over long years to keep as high a percentage of workers as possible on the treadmill, neither too-well nor too-poor off.

How do you get out of that rut and get rich?

There are a variety of ways to beat the wage-salary game and get rich. From worst to best…

Rent-Seeker, Gatekeeper, Influence Peddler, Con Artist

Look at our public servants. They ain't doing too shabby. I've heard Harry Reid, for instance, a life-long elected politician, is worth anywhere from $10M to $80M. How? Not on his Senate salary. Hillary Clinton earns $300K for a 45-minute speech, reportedly quite dull too. I mention this category because it includes a number of surefire ways to get rich, but you're a parasite.

Commission Sales

You get a cut of the money you make for the company–the sky's the limit, right? Actually, sometimes it is. I had an older cousin who was a sales guy for Johnson & Johnson when penicillin hit the market. He, like all the other sales guys, became a millionaire in a couple of years (back when the only houses that cost six-figures were mansions). What did J&J do? They kept my cousin as a VP (at a big cut in pay), a few others too I guess, and fired the rest. Then they revised the commission structure and hired new sales guys. So, there's usually an invisible ceiling between you and all that blue sky.

My friend Sam, a lifelong commission salesman, kept a cartoon from Playboy, circa 1975, framed on his wall. Mr Hippopotamus was excitedly applying for a position as a Currency Retrieval Officer. He would turn in money he found by looking in seat cushions, gutters, under diner booths and so on, and in return he would get to keep ten percent! Sam kept it mounted by his home-office door to remind himself every time he went out that all of us selling for others are essentially currency retrieval officers.

Rare talent

With a few pursuits–acting, modeling and professional sports, for example–your individual talent can mean that you are not selling your time but getting a share of tickets sold and television revenue generated. You are the software in someone else's hardware. Not only are they willing to pay you part of the revenue stream you generate, but the fantasy compensation helps keep tens of thousands of aspirants in the talent pipeline at substandard or no compensation.

Corporate CEO

Who do our money-grubbing politicians deflect attention to as the ultimate bad guys getting criminally rich? But this is hardly true. In a $100B industry, one percent of market share is worth a billion dollars. As a rational person who is one of the company shareholders you want someone with the contacts, acumen, stature, stamina, etc. to gain you half a percent share of market. What is such a person worth? Especially if it's mostly performance-based? I'm not saying there are no shady aspects sometimes, but it's basically just commission sales at a high level. And the fraternity of actual and potential Fortune 500 CEOs numbers probably under 1000 at any given time. Not a strategy to bank on starting out of B-school.

Intellectual Property

Take it from someone who was in book publishing for a long while, nobody gets rich writing books, although as with the rare-talent game, there are the J. K. Rowlings. Songs and movies are better bets but still hit or miss, and, in any case, the whole publishing game is rigged like commission sales. Just remember that all those sixties rock stars got rich not so much off album sales as by going around the concert promoters who had been paying them to play and renting out the concert halls themselves, paying others to do the promotion.

Rentier

Now, this is the life. You get to make money because you're already rich. So, how does someone not already rich use this strategy? My oldest son is a cinematographer, and he's been paid from time to time to review new camera models about to be released. He has a good idea which ones will be market hits, and he buys one on credit. He then hands it over to the production rental place and they rent it out for him for a split of the proceeds. Not only do checks show up in his mailbox in excess (hopefully) of what he has to pay each month, but if his cameras are not rented out, he can use them for free. Money in the mailbox is a good road to getting rich.

Leverage, Equity, Risk

The surest way to get rich? All you have to do is be a key figure with founders' equity in a startup that goes to the moon. If you're not key-figure material, you can do it the way my window washer taught me:

Charles Tips' answer to What is the best route (or tips) for a 25-year-old to become financially independent?

Is it true that "you won't become rich working for somebody else"?

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What are most people ignorant of that prevents them becoming financially wealthy?

What are most people ignorant of that prevents them becoming financially wealthy? by Charles Tips

Answer by Charles Tips:

Nobody ever got rich working for a living.

                             –My dad, to me, frequently

What in the world can it mean that working doesn't make you rich? Well, how many of those fabled bad guys our progressive left obsesses over, the dread "Top One Percent," punch a clock, do you think?

To be sure, you will work hard in order to get rich, and the harder and smarter you work, the better your chances. As my dad would explain, "It's okay to work eight hours a day for someone else. Just work eight hours a day for yourself too… and twelve hours a day on the weekends." And that's exactly what he did, all his life.

Selling your time by the hour will not get you ahead. Human resources departments know to the dime what they have to pay per hour to acquire requisite talent. Even if you degree from a prestigious law school and catch on with a leading firm and can bill at several hundred dollars an hour, by the time the expenses are extracted, you'll be lucky to be grossing a third. Even if you work yourself into an early grave by billing out 3000 hours a year, you're not, by that effort alone, putting yourself on a track to get wealthy.

So, what do you have to know to become financially wealthy?

Probably the first insight you need is that you are out to get wealthy, not financially wealthy. Financial means pertaining to money, but you'll need to recognize that money is simply a "parking place" for past production. The economy runs on "you buy the production of others with your production." Land and production and equity in those things underlies wealth. Money is just a convenience for wheeling and dealing.

Here's what you need to understand if you want to not miss the turn that gets you to the intersection of Luxury Lane and Big Bucks Boulevard.

Know what you are after. Having a big operating budget is not wealth. You can be "churning" millions of dollars a year, but you are only getting wealthy to the extent you are profiting on that churning. A lot of churning with little profit is actually worrisome. A huge house of cards falls just as fast as a small one.

Financial leverage (also known as Other People's Money). A business acquaintance mentions he needs 200 reciprocal capacitors (or whatever) to keep his production line going. He's desperate and willing to pay $2 each. You've got $100 and know where you can get such capacitors for a dollar each. You could double your money! Or, you can borrow, $100 paying back $110, and almost triple your money. Even better, you can get your acquaintance to pay in advance and clear an even bigger cut without putting your money at risk.

Labor leverage. At one point in my retail career, I took on a new window washer. The next time he showed up in a suit, took my $20 from petty cash and left his associate behind to do the window washing. I started seeing his associates around town, at least three different ones. I idly started calculating what he could potentially make with three window washers under him while he concentrated on selling and coordinating–maybe there could be a little money in cleaning glass. When it dawned on me the guy could easily be grossing $120 an hour with a labor cost of at most $21 an hour (35 years ago) and additional overhead of at most $2 an hour, I was shocked that he was netting about four times as much as I was as a partner in a thriving retail business, and with significantly fewer headaches! and employees!

Spotting opportunity. The productivity cycle that creates all the goods that actually represent the economy begins when an enterprising person looks to the future and sees the opportunity to make a profit. Think how easy it would be to start a window-washing business. So, why then do 99 percent of all casual window washers go about it all wrong by doing all the work themselves? Understanding how to spot situations that can be turned into profit-generating opportunities is an acumen that must be cultivated. Most people don't start their own business; they create a job for themselves in addition to which they have to function as boss, secretary and marketing person–four jobs in one, a burnout track rather than leverage.

Make money with money. How did Mark Zuckerberg make $4B in one day last week? How did Jeff Bezos make $6B in twenty minutes a couple of days ago? Was it by increasing their hourly wage? No, as you know, it was by equity. You are frail. You've got something like 100,000 to 150,000 working hours in your entire life (multiply that times what you can net per hour, and there's how rich you will potentially be). Money/equity can work 24/7/365 and not break a sweat. The trick is to live as frugally as possible when starting out young, forgo every non-essential, and set aside every dime you can. Putting your money to work for you can make money for you even while you are sleeping. You can eat out at a nice restaurant and make the money to pay for the meal while you are dining. (Better yet, you can have your fellow diner who wants your business pick up the check.)

And how did it turn out for my dad?

Dad is now 94 and comfortably off. He got a bit wealthy late in life. He played the real estate game and spotted a huge opportunity back in the early 60s. The new Interstate headed through Dallas would create rapidly-growing suburbs. We moved to a small town when I was 12, and he plunged his savings into buying up a couple of square blocks in the poor part of town but near the intersection of the two main roads. I can still remember how bullish he was to score such a coup.

And then all the growth took place, not in the old downtown area as he had assumed, but in the cattle pastures on the other side of the new highway, land he could've owned for a mere $50 an acre at the time (and worth as much as $2M and up now). To make matters worse, just when he realized he needed to be across the highway, interest rates went up to double digits; too high to make money. He spent 20 years feeling like a bug trapped in sap, unable to budge, and that changed him into a very sour man.

The final lesson then, is you have to be cut out for a life spent trying to acquire wealth. There are risks. There are pitfalls. You can get everything brilliantly right, make one deft move after another, and still end up worse off than you started.

Not everyone is cut out for such stress, strain and uncertainty, and this makes a job working for someone else at a reasonably secure salary look pretty good.


Charles Tips' answer to Is it true that "you won't become rich working for somebody else"?

Charles Tips' answer to What should we do to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship?

Charles Tips' answer to Wanting and Making Money: How do I become a billionaire by 30?

What are most people ignorant of that prevents them becoming financially wealthy?

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How ‘Advantage Players’ Game the Casinos

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Busting Vegas : As the casino’s racks of $5,000 and $25,000 chips were being depleted and refilled, phones rang in the gaming pit. Edgy casino personnel crowded the table. Sun* recalls six men in suits watching her intensely. When a partner failed to bet quickly enough, she grabbed his chips and made the wager herself. Sun wanted to get through the eight-deck stack of 416 cards before ARIA Resort & Casino personnel could recognize what was going on. She feared that their play would be discovered and “that they wouldn’t let me cash my chips.” Sun ended the game prematurely — but ahead by $1,100,000 ($1.1 mil).

– At the cashier’s cage, she pressed the casino employees, whose hands she says were trembling, to hurry and convert the chips to dollars. Few gamblers take such substantial sums in cash, usually preferring a check instead.

Over the coming week, Sun and her highly organized group used the same strategy to beat more Las Vegas casinos, including Treasure Island Hotel & Casino and Caesars Palace. They made a trip to Foxwoods Resort Casino in Mashantucket, Conn. Eventually Sun recruited the celebrity poker pro Phil Ivey who is also known as a high-stakes gambler at Craps and Baccarat. During the next year, he wired seven-figure sums to various casinos and did the betting. Sun did the Edge sorting of the cards and tipped Phil off whether to wager on banker or player. Their combined winnings in Atlantic City, New JerseyLondon, United Kingdom, and other places were in the eight figures.

Over the course of four sessions of gambling at private tables at Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City alone, the pair won $9,600,000 ($9.6 mil).

*Cheung Yin Sun. is known for having won more than $20,000,000 ($20 mil) from casinos in less than five years. Elite Western gamblers and rattled casino bosses know her as Kelly, a fast-talking, sunglasses-wearing Advantage player in her 40s. Her father, now deceased, was a wealthy factory owner based in Hong Kong. She says she lost $20,000,000 ($20 mil) of his money playing baccarat and slots. She claims to be unbothered by having blown a fortune in gambling dens around the world.

– In fact, she all but brags about her losses.

How ‘Advantage Players’ Game the Casinos – The New York Times

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Who is Donald Trump’s base? Why is he popular? Why are people voting for him? Why do people like and support him?

They’re mainstream of USA society, who disagree with the elites on the direction that the country should take.  Trump supporters look to Brexit and see only one thing: Freedom.  The elites favor globalism. The mainstream favors nationalism. The majority feels it is attacked by aggressive minorities. The city elites favor immigration, the more the better, legal or illegal. The mainstream does not like that. The elites secretly detest American national identity. The mainstream likes it and does not want to see it dissolved in a bunch of random people held together only by money and the taste for ethnic restaurants.  The mainstream feels it has no representation. Everyone has candidates pandering to them: big business, gays, lesbians, blacks, Hispanics, minorities. The mainstream feels abandoned by both Republicans and Democrats.  It’s nation-state supporters, the core of the nation that feels unrepresented.  In a quagmire of special interest groups, passive-aggressive “victims”, obnoxious Social Justice Warriors professing supposed Superior Virtue of the Oppressed , a handful of rainbow-style mentality advocates who comically imagine against the evidence that they are the oppressed mainstream of the society – the mainstream is not that.  They value independence, sovereignty, controlled borders, no illegal immigration, national character, national identity, are distrustful of global institutions. An exact opposite of metropolitan “elites”.  American politics, like politics everywhere actually, has simply become more polarized. It’s not about money or education. It’s about outlook on life: what a country should be, and whether the direction that it takes is good or bad in perception of the people, like the Brexit.  Basically, elites do not talk at all about political polarization, that would be… inconvenient. They like to believe other things, in spite of demonstrable data: Apparently cats got their tongues.  But in general, I should actually like that – nothing turns voters off more than condescension of the elites. It’s actually good that they are so blinkered.

Answer by Marcin Krol:

There’s a wealth of actual data available if you bother to google for them, here are some good sources:

Who Are Donald Trump's Supporters, Really?

The Mythology Of Trump’s ‘Working Class’ Support

Clearly, they’re mainstream of USA society, who simply disagree with the elites on the direction that the country should take.

Uneducated hicks who do not understand the world?

Such people do not have median income of $72K/year (Trump supporters) vs $61K/year (Sanders, Clinton supporters).

It’s a conflict of worldviews more than that of dollars or government services. Example:

Trump supporters look to Brexit and see only one thing: freedom

Minutes later, when describing his already notorious golf press conference in Scotland on Friday morning after the Brexit vote to an adoring crowd, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee said: “I gave an answer about the pound because somebody asked me about the pound.” He added: “It sounds like I care about the pound. No, I care about the country.”

Note the source: The Guardian. Even the left in UK is not as blinkered re Trump supporters as most of the American elites.

The elites favor globalist outlook. The mainstream favors nationalist outlook. The majority feels it is attacked by aggressive minorities. The city elites favor immigration, the more the better, legal or illegal. The mainstream does not like that. The elites secretly detest American national identity. The mainstream likes it and does not want to see it dissolved in a bunch of random people held together only by money and the taste for ethnic restaurants.

The mainstream feels it has no representation. Everyone has candidates pandering to them: big business, gays, lesbians, blacks, Hispanics, minorities. The mainstream feels abandoned by both Republicans and Democrats. Check this out:

Yes, it’s nation-state supporters, the core of the nation that feels unrepresented.

In a quagmire of special interest groups, passive-aggressive “victims”, obnoxious Social Justice Warriors professing supposed Superior Virtue of the Oppressed , a handful of rainbow-style mentality advocates who comically imagine against the evidence that they are the oppressed mainstream of the society – the mainstream is not that.

They value independence, sovereignty, controlled borders, no illegal immigration, national character, national identity, are distrustful of global institutions. An exact opposite of metropolitan “elites”.

The icing on the cake? As of today, Trump would get 33% of Hispanic vote. Therefore, the support for Trump is nothing what the elites desire to think it is.

American politics, like politics everywhere actually, has simply become more polarized. It’s not about money or education. It’s about outlook on life: what a country should be, and whether the direction that it takes is good or bad in perception of the people. The Brexit is a good example.

Basically, elites do not talk at all about political polarization, that would be.. inconvenient. They like to believe other things, in spite of demonstrable data:

Apparently cats got their tongues.

But in general, I should actually like that – nothing turns voters off more than condescension of the elites. It’s actually good that they are so blinkered.

Who is Donald Trump's base? Why is he popular? Why are people voting for him? Why do people like and support him?

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How intelligent is George W. Bush?

This question is very deceptive. Bush’s intelligence is not really the question. His effectiveness as a leader is what is being asked, really. I think Bush was at best a mediocre intelligence. I think I did better than he did in school and I think I am smarter than he is. But that’s just ny opinion. I also think he was a great and effective leader who accomplished almost all of his objectives. He was a great leader the same way the leader of the lemmings is great enough to lead all the lemmings off the cliff. Bush got his idiot followers to devastate the nation. He could lead, but he couldn’t make good decisions or the correct choices and he almost always re-inforced failure.  Bush was stupid and he made bad choices over and over and when they were discovered to be wrong he doubled down on them and lost again. It’s never too late to make a losing bet. It’s easy to ask if Bush was stupid but all you have to do is see the results of his very effective leadership to know the answer — he was a moron of the highest caliber who not only destroyed Iraq and killed, wounded and displaced millions of people, but also brought this nation from its zenith in power, prestige and prosperity to its nadir in shame, derision, disrespect, financial bankruptcy and debt (not to mention losing in Iraq, Afghanistan, Ossetia, North Korea and Somalia) in just 8 short years. He gave Al Qaeda every single thing they wanted. He fought the Iraq war for the benefit of Iran, who turned out to be the only real victor.  George W. Bush was a blind moron whose actions devastated this country at a time when we could have been doing a thousand good things like building bridges or going to Mars or replacing schools. Instead he mortgaged the future to lose a major was in the Middle East.

Answer by Jay Bazzinotti:

This question comes up from time to time on Quora and it is very deceptive. Bush’s intelligence is not really the question. His effectiveness as a leader is what is being asked, really. I think Bush was at best a mediocre intelligence. I think I did better than he did in school and I think I am smarter than he is. But that’s just ny opinion.

I also think he was a great and effective leader who accomplished almost all of his objectives. He was a great leader the same way the leader of the lemmings is great enough to lead all the lemmings off the cliff. Bush got his idiot followers to devastate the nation. He could lead, but he couldn’t make good decisions or the correct choices and he almost always re-inforced failure.

And I never thought his father was a doddering fool. Anyone who mistakes the former head of the CIA as a fool is really STUPID. Old Bush had people tortured and killed, you better believe it. But he did it in secret the way you’re supposed to do it. Young Bush, being stupid, had many people tortured and killed, many of them innocent. But he HAD to let it be discovered that we were doing this, discovered either by accident or design, on an industrial basis such as at Abu Ghraib.

But then he denied we tortured anyone when everyone knew it was true. The fucking photographic evidence was incontrovertible. The testimony of the tortured innocent screamed loudly. He settled with them for millions without accepting culpability. Only an idiot would believe we didn’t torture people. Even Trump is screaming about how we should do it more.

Why would Bush deny that we tortured people when it was clear that we did? He obviously must have thought it was effective. So why wouldn’t he scream it loud and proud from the rooftops — “if you fuck with us we will torture you!”? Why didn’t he just come out and say it? It’s because he was ashamed of what he was doing. He was stupid to do it, the Army didnt want to do it and he was ashamed of the damage it would do to the US. His actions at Abu Ghraib probably recruited thousands for the enemy and instilled hatred for the US, possibly for generations. We were supposed to be “liberators”, greeted as “liberators”, hailed and loved. And yet here we were torturing people on an industrial scale. It may have been a secret here for awhile but it was no secret to the Iraqis who were supposed to greet us as liberators. They knew what was happening. The actions at Haditha (and others) and the cover-ups all the way to the top sent a message to the Iraqis that the US stood for absolutely nothing. Our ideals were false. George Bush gave them that “epiphany”. The installation of Bremer and Sanchez, probably the two most incompetent people in government was idiocy. The instutionalization of ideology over practicality was astounding in its stupidity.

Bush was stupid and he made bad choices over and over and when they were discovered to be wrong he doubled down on them and lost again. It’s never too late to make a losing bet. It’s easy to ask if Bush was stupid but all you have to do is see the results of his very effective leadership to know the answer — he was a moron of the highest caliber who not only destroyed Iraq and killed, wounded and displaced millions of people, but also brought this nation from its zenith in power, prestige and prosperity to its nadir in shame, derision, disrespect, financial bankruptcy and debt (not to mention losing in Iraq, Afghanistan, Ossetia, North Korea and Somalia) in just 8 short years. He gave Al Qaeda every single thing they wanted. He fought the Iraq war for the benefit of Iran, who turned out to be the only real victor.

Now THAT is an achievement that speaks for itself.

Read for your enjoyment and disgust:

“Fiasco” by Thomas Ricks, the foremost military writer in America and a former Bush confidante

“Life in the Emerald City” by reporter Rajiv Chandrasekaran. You absolutely will not believe his story

“We Meant Well” by Peter van Buren of the US State Department stationed in Iraq during the war

“Maher Arar”, on Wikipedia and in the NYT, the Canadian who was renditioned and tortured by Bush as a result of mistaken identity

“Why We Lost the Iraq War” by Maj General Dan Bolger who served on the CoS during Iraq

You cannot read any of these books and come away with any conclusion other than George W. Bush was a blind moron whose actions devastated this country at a time when we could have been doing a thousand good things like building bridges or going to Mars or replacing schools. Instead he mortgaged the future to lose a major was in the Middle East.

How intelligent is George W. Bush?

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Does US want to move toward a society where money can buy privileged access, at the expense of effort?

be educated. That means hearing all sorts of different sources of information, and critical thinking. You are being manipulated. So am I. At least in theory. It’s up to me and you and everyone else to recognize that, to think about our own rational self-interests.

Answer by Dave Haynie:

The USA isn’t a single organism… it’s a complex mix of individuals and collectives. It doesn’t have a unified “want” for money buying privileged access. However, there are plenty of elements in American society — and pretty much all societies — that want this. Pretty much to a person, they are the people who already have some level of privileged access, and desire more.

If you do not want a society like that, you need to be careful about your political choices. Privilege, Plutocracy, etc. thrives like most unpopular things do: a small number of people are successful at manipulating a large population to make political choices against their best interests. As well, they can often be successful at insulating themselves from politics, at least to an extent.

The Power of Education and Truth

One of the hallmarks of a free society is education. Educated people tend to be curious about their world, and wary of hucksters, snake oil salesmen, frauds, and manipulators. If you look at Europe today, many countries offer free or very low cost college. They do this both because a more educated population yields a richer society, but also, a more educated population makes better political choices. Educated people practice critical thinking, they are not so easily mislead by those seeking to manipulate a population.

Toward this end, the stance on education and science of a candidate is a strong indication if that person is looking in the long term for an egalitarian society or some kind of plutocracy or oligarchy.

The Power of Competitive Elections

Given that we’re in an election cycle right now in the USA, in a Presidential year, it’s often just assumed that most elections are competitive. Because, after all, the Presidency generally is. Sure, there are years with one Party or another doing very well… President Obama won both elections with over 50% of the vote, the first two-term majority in most of our lifetimes. Ronald Reagan won an amazing 58.8% of the vote in 1984, claiming all but one state and relegating Walter Mondale to the second-worst Presidential election performance in history.

But there are quite a few elections in the USA that are not seriously contested. A specific example is the US House of Representatives. Representatives are, in theory, very close to the current will of The People. That’s how the House was designed: representatives by districts of roughly equal population, two year terms. The People’s House.

But just about anything that’s corruptible will eventually be corrupted. And because there are no specific rules about Congressional Districts (aside from some potential Federal oversight), states can draw them rather arbitrarily.. a practice known as Gerrymandering. And that ability can lead to things like this:

Those are the actual shape of a few Congressional districts. Districts are supposed to include roughly the same number of people, within a state anyway. That’s at least one obvious metric of fairness — my vote shouldn’t count more than yours based on where I live. On years divisible by ten, such as 2010, the Federal Government conducts a census, and states re-draw their Congressional districts based on that census. That’s on the surface good and proper.

However, as with those featured above, the districts are drawn for political gain. In the case of North Carolina, that snaky-looking thing is the 12th district, which is drawn that way to deliver a 64% African-American district. Not surprisingly, in modern politics, that’s a guaranteed Democratic district.

But there’s some of the problem. In drawing it that way, perhaps African Americans in North Carolina are given a district they completely dominate. But this sold Blue district also makes the surrounding six districts more reliably Red.

And none of that is my actual point in this article. Rather, I’m concerned about uncontested districts. In theory, your Representative represents you and your neighbors… I mean, bloody hell, it’s even in the person’s official title. But it’s also the case that, in order to win an election in these days of media influence, the average Representative in 2012 had to raise $1.6 million. To me, that’s real money.. I had a hard enough time raising the $1600 I needed some years ago to participate in a 3-day breast cancer walk.

So to the point: a candidate from a very competitive Congressional district probably has to actually represent a good chunk of that district’s people — ideally all of them, at least as far as possible. A candidate from a perfectly safe district is far more likely to be “The Congressman from Exxon”. Uncontested districts, and similar uncontested elections in other contests throughout the USA, are some of the enablers of corporatocracy, at least as long as we allow public officials to be bought by the rich.

The other obvious problem with this is that it doesn’t actually balance populations to voting outcomes. In the 2014 election, there were 13 Representatives being elected in North Carolina. The Republicans won a state-wide 55% of the vote, to the Democrats 43%. You’d sort of like to hear that the Republicans won 7 Representatives, the Democrats won 6. Or even 8/5. But no… thanks to Gerrymandering, the Democrats took 3, the Republicans 10. And sure, this has worked the other way, too. True Blue Maryland is a contender to districts as weird as those in NC.

The Power of Lies in Elections

The most protected of protected speech in the USA is political speech. If you are a political candidate or organization, speaking about another candidate, you can literally say just about anything about that person. Read more here: False Ads: There Oughta Be A Law! – Or Maybe Not

In this case, I have to come down in support of the lie. Yup, that’s how I roll on this. And here’s why: if you outlaw lies in politics in any way, you can only do that by empowering some arbiter of lies. Remember the last section, how the duty to apportion Congressional districts among voters was mutated into weird political manipulation and, in many cases, a minority rule?

The only cure for this is, again, Education and, perhaps, promotion of the idea that being smart about the vote is your patrotic duty. Because it simply is. Complacency makes the manipulation of the masses by the wealthy very easy. The problem is that being non-complacent is kind of a balancing act. If things always go my way, I might stop thinking deeply about how that happens. And if things never go my way, I might well decide I have no power, and opt out of exercising the power I actually have. In fact, that’s pretty much how you get uncontested votes — everyone “just knows” there’s no chance of not electing the same guy you had last year.

The Power of Voter Disenfranchisement and other Cheats

Some elections are won by very narrow margins. A classic case is the 2000 Presidential election, in which it all came down to Florida’s winner-take-all state election, which came down to lots of political manipulation and a recorded margin of under 550 votes in favor of George W. Bush over Al Gore.

The popular story is that Ralph Nader, the Green Party candidate, took enough votes from Gore to allow the controversy. And that’s likely: exit polls put 66% of Nader voters who still would have voted for Gore, 33% for Bush. Gore would have won without contest if that actually happend.

But there’s the other thing: prior to the election, 173,000 voters were “cleansed” from the rolls in Florida. And most of these due to an error made by a private company paid to produce lists of convicted felons who were on the voter rolls. Oops… nearly all of these people were, worst-case, convicted of misdemeanors.

Some notices were sent out to correct the original “you can’t vote” letters sent out, but it’s estimated thousands of legal voters were turned away at the polls.

So again, a couple of things to understand. First of all, that education thing again. Know your rights. Do not accept being barred from the vote, if that happens and you know you’re legally able to vote. Argue, fight, file a provisional ballot, call the local news crew, make noise. This is your right, and it’s worth defending.

Second thing: look for the candidates, parties, pundits, whomever is trying to make voting more difficult. Voter ID laws, long voter lines, scarey billboards put up near polling locales, there are dozens of ways that The Few want to prevent The Many from voting. Do not accept this, and don’t let others, either. People trying to steal this right from you are real enemies. Know your enemies — that’s the only way to put yourself on a path to defeat them.

The Power of Money in Elections

A large part of modern electioneering is advertising. That happens because it’s well proven that people respond to well designed ads. And it’s also well proven that voters will not vote for a person they don’t know.

So for a minute, let’s look at this year’s election from the #3 guy, Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate (#feelthejohnson). I kind of like Gary.. he actually seems like he’d run the country better than at least one of the candidate in the major parties this year. And unlike most third parties, the Libertarians actually have electoral ballot access in many states, and claim they’re on-target for all 50 (they had 48 states + DC in 2012, so they were at least credible). He was Governor of New Mexico — he does have actual executive experience. I found I’m about 67% in agreement with him, versus others in the high 90% range, and at least one at about 7%. There are plenty of things I don’t like about Gary. But the primary reason I’m not voting for him is simple: only the Democrat or the Republican can win. Period. End of discussion, and not really pertinent to this article.

But there’s another reason millions of people won’t vote for Gary: they have no frickin’ idea he even exists. It’s actually worse this year than ever. So ok, Mr. Johnson ran in 2012, and got 1% of the US popular vote. He did not win any states.

He’s running against the Cult of Personality like no one in history. Donald J. Trump was pretty well known, at least if you’re in the mid-Atlantic East Coast, for decades. More recently, he was well known as a game show host (“The Apprentice”) on network television. Hillary R. Clinton was First Lady, Senator from New York, Presidential candidate and Secretary of State, and voted the most Admired Woman in the World, by Americans, in the annual Gallup polls (Mr. Trump came in #3 among men this year… Johnson, not on the list).

And there’s the rub. We already know these two major candidates, at least to some extent. In the 2012 election, both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney raised around $1 billion for their campaigns. Gary Johnson in 2012 raised about $2.5 million. That would be good for a House race, not close to enough to run for Senator. Much less President.

So it’s mostly just political wonks and Libertarians who know Gary Johnson. And I’ll give some credit to the media this cycle: I have seen/heard Johnson more this year than any third party candidate since Ralph Nader in 2000 (and Nader at the time was already a household name). There is no possible way, with that kind of budget, that Johnson can compete with the other two. People will not vote for a person they don’t know about.

Nuff Said… It’s Up to Us

There are plenty of other factors, but ultimately, this is still the choice of The People. My best advice: be educated. That means hearing all sorts of different sources of information, and critical thinking. You are being manipulated. So am I. At least in theory. It’s up to me and you and everyone else to recognize that, to think about our own rational self-interests.

Does US want to move toward a society where money can buy privileged access, at the expense of effort?

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Geneva to get ‘café fellatio’ by end of year (2016)

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Is it true that people who are wealthy and have connections get a less severe punishment for doing something wrong compared to the “avera…

Is it true that people who are wealthy and have connections get a less severe punishment for doing … by Ed Caruthers

Answer by Ed Caruthers:

This certainly happens sometimes. We see examples. E.g., Google “6 month sentence for rape”.

The justice system pretty consistently give harsher sentences to those considered (by the judge or jury) to be “bad people”. And the justice system often gives lighter sentences to those considered “good people”. “Bad people” are assumed to present a stronger risk of hurting others in the future. “Good people” are assumed to have learned their lessons and to not present a future risk. It’s assumed that “bad people” will never be productive. It’s assumed that “good people” will go on to work at good jobs, pay taxes, raise good kids, an maybe even do charity work. It’s often believed that sending “good people” to jail is inappropriate.

I might not object to this, if wealth and race weren’t so strongly correlated with judgments about who the good people and the bad people are. See a book length treatment of this subject, The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap

by Matt Taibbi and Molly Crabapple

Is it true that people who are wealthy and have connections get a less severe punishment for doing something wrong compared to the "avera…

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