What can a person with an IQ of 160 do that a person with an IQ of 100 cannot? Are certain things fundamentally unlearnable/undoable like…

All those degrees plus the high IQ will get you a skinny mocha grande at Starbucks – if you also happen to have $5. Alone they’re really not worth much, certainly not as much as: hard work, commitment, a high tolerance for frustration, the ability to see the best in other people and communicate with them, belief in yourself, and the ability to be comfortable in your own skin, to name but a few.

There is plentiful-research which demonstrates that the people who are most likely to be successful in their careers and interpersonal lives, the people who become leaders and influencers, who make money, who ‘play well with others’ and who have a high level of satisfaction in their lives are people with IQs in the 120-140 range, in other words, one standard deviation above the norm.

People two or more standard deviations above the normal IQ are more likely to feel isolated and depressed. They have greater self-doubt and are often poorer at communicating with a wide variety of people.  As teens and young adults, they’re more likely to manage depression, isolation and uncertainty by self-medicating with alcohol and drugs (which have the benefit not only of altering mood temporarily but also of providing a the person with the social interactions and friends (s)he lacks).

Answer by Lila Hanft:

As someone with an IQ of 160+, I’m in complete agreement with Anonymous and others who have suggested that the significance of super-high IQ is ambiguous at best. There’s definitely an increase in some kinds of cognitive abilities, but research indicates that there’s very little correlation between high IQ and anything you might remotely think of success in life.

I tend to identify patterns more quickly than other people and to do well in tasks and fields where pattern recognition plays a big role. I’m more likely to stick with — and to enjoy — the exercise of parsing the significance of complex relationships among abstract ideas.  It gives me a feeling of flow, of forgetting myself.  So that meant that school was easier for me than for others, and the farther along in school I got and the more choice I had in what I studied, the more I like learning and excelled at learning. By the time I was 30, I had three masters degrees and a Ph.D., and if money were no object, I’d go back to college and take classes in all the subjects I thought were boring 30 years ago — because learning new ways of thinking about the world is something I enjoy.

BUT.  To put a modern twist on an old saying, All those degrees,  the high IQ will  get you a skinny mocha grande at Starbucks — if you also happen to have $5. Alone they’re really not worth much, certainly not as much as: hard work, commitment, a high tolerance for frustration, the ability to see the best in other people and communicate with them, belief in yourself, and the ability to be comfortable in your own skin, to name but a few.

As others have mentioned here, the empirical evidence supports no correlation, let alone causation, between super-high IQs and greater success in life.

But there is  plentiful research which demonstrates that the people who are most likely to be successful in their careers and interpersonal lives, the people who become leaders and influencers, who make money, who play well with others and who have a high level of satisfaction in their lives are people with IQs in the 120-140 range, in other words, one standard deviation above the norm.

People two or more standard deviations above the normal IQ are more likely to feel isolated and depressed. They have greater self-doubt and are often poorer at communicating with a wide variety of people.  As teens and young adults, they’re more likely to manage depression, isolation and uncertainty by self-medicating with alcohol and drugs (which have the benefit not only of altering mood temporarily but also of providing a the person with the social interactions and friends he lacks).  The problem could be, as others have suggested here, that higher IQ people are they’re own worst enemies, sabotaging themselves by assuming others are less intelligent and thus less valuable, by being condescending or “snotty” and “acting superior.”

But I think the problem is really with the concept of IQ itself — how we define intelligence and what we expect an IQ score to be able to predict.  For me, the obvious cultural bias of IQ testing is at the root of the problem. Much of a test like the Stanford-Binet is predicated on the assumption that the test subject has of a certain level of cultural literacy (in one single and very specific hegemonic culture), which races the question of what, exactly an IQ test is measuring, and what we mean by intelligence.

As Anonymous wrote: “very few of the important problems in life are of the kind that high IQ people tend to be good at. . . . [I find doing well as school] fairly easy, but that doesn’t mean much in the real world.”

What can a person with an IQ of 160 do that a person with an IQ of 100 cannot? Are certain things fundamentally unlearnable/undoable like…

About akiramorikawa

superconnection . pattern-recognition . iDesign
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